Research and report on the specific risk to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are at risk of underweight and nutrition deficiencies

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Lyssa
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Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:07 pm

Research and report on the specific risk to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are at risk of underweight and nutrition deficiencies

Post by Lyssa » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:10 pm

Your Assignment Module Number and Heading: Gap training CHCECE004 Promote and provide healthy food and drinks
Your Assignment Type: Other
Currently Working in Childcare? Yes
Your knowledge: Beginner

Your Question?
Research and report on the specific risk to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are at risk of underweight and nutrition deficiencies

What is your answer so far or What have you done so far as an attempt to solve this question?
i have googled the question but still do not understand what the risks are

Description and Message:



leahrp
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jun 16, 2019 9:32 pm

Re: Research and report on the specific risk to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are at risk of underw

Post by leahrp » Sat Jun 06, 2020 11:29 pm

hello there, can i please have some help to try and get to my word count to 1000 at the moment is reaching 400 words in my current awnser read below for question and i will put my awnser below


Research and report on the specific risks to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are at risk of underweight and nutrition deficiencies??


awnser i have so far


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to suffer the worst diet-related health of all population groups in Australia.
the nutrition among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people highlights the importance of nutrition promotion and the prevention of diet-related disease

in very few Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children consumed adequate amounts of healthy foods consistent with recommendations of the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Further more over two-fifths (41 per cent) of total daily energy reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from unhealthy foods and drinks classified as discretionary

The most common diseases In traditional times, they gathered, trapped and hunted indigenous foods that were predominantly low in dietary energy, fat, salt and sugar, and high in fibre and complex carbohydrates. They also expended considerable physical energy in obtaining sufficient water and food to survive

the most common nutrition related disease

There are many factors that contribute to good health and the prevention of disease, particularly the factors that are known as ‘lifestyle factors’: being physically active; eating nutritious foods; not smoking; limiting alcohol use; and maintaining a healthy weight Maintaining healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent the onset of many chronic diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and diabetes.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience chronic diseases at higher rates than non-Indigenous people and chronic diseases are responsible for more than two-thirds of the total health gap Following a healthy lifestyle and reducing exposure to the modifiable risk factors can contribute to the prevention of chronic disease.

Factors that can prevent or slow down growth

Good maternal nutrition and healthy infant and childhood growth are fundamental to the achievement and maintenance of health throughout life. Key factors that impact on the maternal and perinatal outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and their babies include young maternal age, remoteness and socioeconomic disadvantage

Good nutrition prior to conception and during pregnancy influences both the mother’s health and that of her baby. It can influence intrauterine growth, birthweight, and the risk of complications during pregnancy and birth

Poor nutrition in early childhood can affect growth, which is associated with both short and long term health effects including increased risk of infection and development of chronic diseases later in life [ Poor nutrition can result in both over-nutrition (obesity) and under-nutrition, with increasing rates of overweight and obesity being observed in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, particularly Torres Strait Islander children

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