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Children Refuse To Go To Unhygienic And Dirty Toilets In NSW Public Schools

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Dirty Toilets In NSW Schools Image by Michal Jarmoluk from Pixabay

It has been found that the NSW public-school infrastructure is of so low grade that students try to not use the toilets by not eating and drinking during the day. Students do not want to use their school’s “absolutely disgraceful” toilets due to this bad infrastructure.

After a recent survey, it has been reported among NSW public schools that due to the overcrowded, dirty and mal-management of toilets, parents are choosing private schools for a better arrangement of toileting facilities.

Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW vice president Yvonne Hilsz told the inquiry’s first hearing on Monday “We have parents complaining their children have (urinary tract infections), and bladder issues because children refuse to go to the toilet during the day. Some school toilets don’t have working soap dispensers, the doors don’t lock, they’re dark and they stink from decades worth of urine soaking into tiling grout". Hiltz said.

After the submission of the report, it has been noticed by the Concord High School Parents and Citizens Association that there is a shortage of toilets and bathrooms installed without any plan to replace them.

It has been found that the Public-School infrastructure is of so low grade that students try to not use the toilets by not eating and drinking during the day. Students do not want to use their school’s “absolutely disgraceful” toilets due to this bad infrastructure. 

After the submission of the report, it has been noticed by the Concord High School Parents and Citizens Association that there is a shortage of toilets and bathrooms installed without any plan to replace them.

Through the volunteers, $150,000 grant from the government was secured to upgrade bathrooms, but they were only able to modify only 4 toilets.

Despite being short on toilets and outdoor seating, $250,000 was spent on a new commercial kitchen at the school’s canteen, which students can’t use.

Demountable classrooms were also being used to address overcrowding in growing catchments, encroaching on school ovals and preventing children from exercising, the inquiry heard.

Temporary infrastructure, overcrowding and a lack of consultation with school communities about catchment and enrolment were pushing parents who can afford it to send their children to private schools, Hiltz said.

Reference: 
Why Some NSW Students Refusing To Use Toilets At School, 7 NEWS

 

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