CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

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mwibusa
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CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Sat Aug 29, 2015 10:44 am

Hi, can same one help me with the following question because i have trued to do it and research but i could't find any information which related to this question, please please some one help me. thanks

1. Why should educators critically examine their own values, beliefs and attitudes related to difference and diversity?
2. Why is respecting, understanding and including a child’s culture important?
3. What strategies can you use to enrich children’s understanding and respect for cultural identities within the service’s community?
4. Explain your understanding of the term ‘cultural competence’.
5. How can you be a culturally competent practitioner?
6. What is tokenism and how can it be avoided in an early childhood setting.
7. Describe 4 strategies you could use to challenge discriminatory or bias comments from children?
8. Explain 4 ways that group activities could be used as an opportunity to acknowledge the diverse societies of Australia.
9. Why is it important to understand the broader issues faced by families within the service community?
10. Explain the proposition that the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) sets out in relation to cultural competence.


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Lorina
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Sat Aug 29, 2015 11:25 pm

Here is some info to help you gain a better understanding of what it means to be cultural competent:

What It Means To Be Cultural Competent

Understanding Cultiral Competence

Hope this helps,

:geek:,
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:44 am

Thanks Lorina
Can you please me to correct this question because i am not sure about this answer. please help

4. Explain your understanding of the term ‘cultural competence’.
• Cultural competency is a commitment to engage respectfully with people from other cultures.
OR
• Cultural competence is about our will and actions to build understanding between people, to be respectful and open to different cultural perspectives, strengthen cultural security and work towards equality in opportunity

5 How can you be a culturally competent practitioner?
The process of becoming culturally competent is one in which we come to see our own cultural lens and explore ways in which it may differ from other points of view. We make gains as our ability to see the value in many perspectives is enhanced. We stereotype less, become more culturally sensitive and provide more effective treatment to the families we serve.
A person who is culturally competent can communicate sensitively and effectively with people who have different languages, cultures, religions, genders, ethnicities, disabilities, ages and sexualities.

Culturally competent staff strive to provide services that are consistent with the clients’ needs and values firstly by acknowledging them, and secondly by, wherever possible, responding to them appropriately.

Community care practitioners need to develop a broad repertoire of skills, knowledge, attitudes, perspectives and practices which they can use to enhance their cultural competence and direct their relationships with clients and colleagues.

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Mon Aug 31, 2015 7:32 pm

For 4) I would choose:
Cultural competency is a commitment to engage respectfully with people from other cultures.


Also, your response for Q5) is good! You may need to provide some examples that you will do...

Don't forget to reference your information from your source when you submit your assignment...

:geek:,
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Tue Sep 01, 2015 12:30 am

Thanks Lorina.

Here i have anther two question for you to check and correct me please and if it's wrong please help me with the good answers thanks i am looking forward to hear form you back soon.

6. What is tokenism and how can it be avoided in an early childhood setting.
Tokenism is the act or practice of making an obligatory or small minimal effort towards something. It gives the connotation of requirement. The word is frequently used regarding inclusion and inclusive practices, particularly regarding minorities.
Token representation reduces the importance of significance of the contributions and roles of a group

•Do not display the single item
•Use pictures along with the dolls or real
Objects

One way teachers can avoid having a tokenistic classroom is first consider their own personal views and judgments; this has to take place before a teacher can even begin to monitor their classroom climate. Every teacher’s goal should be for all students to feel included and welcome. Teachers can directly promote diversity and use inclusive practices. They should address awkward or heated situations immediately, before they have a chance to escalate. Students should get the chance to know each other and feel connected to their classmates, teacher, and learning space.

7. Describe 4 strategies you could use to challenge discriminatory or bias comments from children?
Continually re-evaluate ways to integrate an anti-bias approach into all
aspects of the program.
- Watch for bias in the environment that children encounter and listen to
their comments. Gather materials that contradict the stereotypes and
makes the invisible visible. Make comments that contradict statements of
bias.
- Ask questions to develop critical thinking.
- Create opportunities to make comparisons between stereotypical images
and a variety of real images.
- Create opportunities for problem-solving: what would you do if?
- Take action to protest bias.

OR
• Respond immediately: the child will have a better understanding of the response if it is given immediately. Never ignore a comment or a question that appears bias or discriminatory.
• Respond simply – try not to use complicated language and be honest in your answers. Show an awareness of the child’s age and stage of development
• Respond authentically- always use honest answers and correct information. Children should not be ridiculed or chastised for what they say if it does reflect bias attitudes, but children need to be given the correct information.
• Talk about your own experiences. Share a story of a time you felt excluded, how you resolved the issue and what you learnt from it. Invite the children to make comments. You can guide them to imagine how they would have felt in such a situation; how they would have ponded, what they would have expected the outcome to be.
• Encourage children to think though the consequences of discrimination. Find examples children can relate to in books and through personal experiences in their own lives.

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Tue Sep 01, 2015 6:43 pm

1. Why should educators critically examine their own values, beliefs and attitudes related to difference and diversity?

This means that as educators, we need to ‘think about our own values, beliefs and attitudes related to diversity and difference and acknowledge and address any bias that we may hold’ (Educators’ Guide p. 22). As well as critically examining our own assumptions, ‘cultural competence’ requires us to take a strong approach to countering racism and bias when we encounter it. This is a long way from a ‘live and let live’ attitude. It involves making a conscious decision to promote children’s cultural competence so that we can build a just and inclusive Australian society.

2. Why is respecting, understanding and including a child’s culture important?

For all human beings, culture is the basis of who we are as people.
Children absorb their culture as they learn and grow. For education and care services, understanding and valuing cultural diversity is key to countering racism in our services and in the wider community. Children need to be supported to explore the uniqueness of their culture and identity, while also understanding the cultural diversity that exists in their service and in the world around them. Educators and services need to be able to recognise, value and draw on children’s cultural backgrounds as well as helping children maintain their own languages while learning English. Above all, a service needs to support children to understand that being different does not make us better or worse than other people, but that all of our differences can be appreciated.
Cultural competence is especially important in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Education and care services can help to recognise the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s
home cultures as crucial to their identity and developing a sense of self-worth.
We must also work to ensure we recognise the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island cultures as part of the cultural heritage of all Australians.

3. What strategies can you use to enrich children’s understanding and respect for cultural identities within the service’s community?

Educators who are culturally competent respect multiple cultural ways of knowing, seeing and living, celebrate the benefits of diversity and have an ability to understand and honour differences. This is evident in everyday practice when educators demonstrate an ongoing commitment to developing their own cultural competence in a two way process with families and communities.
Educators view culture and the context of family as central to children’s sense of being and belonging, and to success in lifelong learning. Educators also seek to promote children’s cultural competence.
Cultural competence is much more than awareness of cultural differences. It is the ability to understand, communicate with, and effectively interact with people across cultures. Cultural competence encompasses:
• being aware of one’s own world view
• developing positive attitudes towards cultural differences
• gaining knowledge of different cultural practices and world views
• developing skills for communication and interaction across cultures.


8. Explain 4 ways that group activities could be used as an opportunity to acknowledge the diverse societies of Australia.

Sit in a circle and talk about having a pet. Show pictures of different breeds of puppies. Discuss: What do you notice about the puppies? Do all puppies look the same or different? Does the variety in the appearance of the puppies makes them more or less interesting? Conclude that even though each of the puppies looks different they are all lovable.
Look at each other, especially at each other's facial features and hair. Chart / graph colour of skin, hair and eyes; colour, length of hair and attributes such as curls etc.
Game: Simon (or Sunita) says. Provide directions to highlight individual and cultural diversity e.g. Everyone with brown eyes, stand up. Everyone who has a dog as a pet put your right hand on your head. Everyone whose favorite sport is soccer, stand on one foot. Everyone who speaks more than one language, jump up and down.
Game: Bingo. Students move around their group, or class, asking questions and recording the names of people who fit the description on a list: e.g. has played basketball; has celebrated a religious occasion; likes curry; has traveled on a plane; is allergic to peanuts; has more than three names; was not born in Australia; likes Vegemite; has more than two siblings; has lived in another country; likes cold weather; speaks more than one language; rides a bicycle. First to complete their list calls out Bingo. Regroup to talk about / make a graph showing similarities and differences between class members.
Students tell one new thing they learned about a classmate / name one way in which they and another student are alike (Something they didn't know before playing the game). Students might say, for example, "I didn't know that Jacob spoke Hebrew" or "I didn't know that Ruth played soccer."
Discuss: Have you or any of your friends/classmates traveled to another country / moved to Australia from another country? How did you feel when you arrived (e.g. lonely, excited)? What does 'multiculturalism' mean? How has migration made a positive impact on Australian society? What is race? How would you define it? Have you ever encountered racism? Explain what happened and how it was dealt with (by you, your friends, the school, family, community or by the law).

10) Explain the proposition that the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) sets out in relation to cultural competence.

Can some one please check all these question form me please because i am not sure about this answer, please correct any mistake that you will find. Also question 10 i am so confuse on how to answer it and please provide answer for this question please thanks

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Tue Sep 01, 2015 7:21 pm

Just had a read through your responses to the questions and they are pretty good! I don't think there is anything that needs changing or adding! :thumbup:

For Q7 the following is a better option:

• Respond immediately: the child will have a better understanding of the response if it is given immediately. Never ignore a comment or a question that appears bias or discriminatory.
• Respond simply – try not to use complicated language and be honest in your answers. Show an awareness of the child’s age and stage of development
• Respond authentically- always use honest answers and correct information. Children should not be ridiculed or chastised for what they say if it does reflect bias attitudes, but children need to be given the correct information.
• Talk about your own experiences. Share a story of a time you felt excluded, how you resolved the issue and what you learnt from it. Invite the children to make comments. You can guide them to imagine how they would have felt in such a situation; how they would have ponded, what they would have expected the outcome to be.
• Encourage children to think though the consequences of discrimination. Find examples children can relate to in books and through personal experiences in their own lives.

Explain 4 ways that group activities could be used as an opportunity to acknowledge the diverse societies of Australia.

I really like the examples you gave in this response! Really good ideas! :thumbup:

For Q10 - this may help:
Understanding Cultural Competence

Overall, as I said really good responses! Very detailed!

:geek:,
Lorina

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:04 pm

Thanks Lorina, for all you hard work that you have done to help me. Here i have one question left for you to help me please. i look forward to hear you soon


10. Explain the proposition that the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) sets out in relation to cultural competence.

Competency is something education and care services and educators strive for constantly. It is what a service must demonstrate to prove it is meeting or exceeding the National Quality Standard, and what an educator trying to obtain a Certificate III or a Diploma has to prove. But there is a special type of competency that all services must achieve to deliver high quality education and care to all children—cultural competency. Cultural competence is an essential practice of both the Early Years Learning Framework and the Framework for School Aged Care—My Time, Our Place. It is based on the principle contained in both frameworks—respect for diversity. Can educators and services ever truly become culturally competent? Many would say that achievement of this competency is always just beyond grasp. That is why the
EYLF and My Time, Our Place educators’ guides describe cultural competency as a journey. This journey involves developing skills, gathering knowledge, and exploring and questioning attitudes. Why is cultural competence so important? For all human beings, culture is the basis of who we are as people. Children absorb their culture as they learn and grow.

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Wed Sep 02, 2015 7:05 pm

Yeah, that's a good response as well!

:geek:,
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:26 pm

Thanks So much Lorina

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:51 pm

a) Research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities


1) Using the Web or local library research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in the area where you work, or are undertaking your work placement.

This practice resource — working with Aboriginal people and communities is a guide for all
Community Services and relevant non-government organisation (NGO) staff, particularly field staff. It has been developed to improve service delivery to Aboriginal people by providing staff with key facts, and information relevant to working with Aboriginal communities in NSW. This resource will help us become more culturally aware and responsive to the needs of Aboriginal people and communities. Working with Aboriginal people and communities provides important information to improve our knowledge and understanding of the diverse cultural dynamics that exist within Aboriginal families and communities. It suggests some engagement and communication strategies that will improve the way we work with and relate to Aboriginal people. Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is something all allied health students will probably experience regardless of their clinical education placement context.

2) As part of your research, consult with appropriate persons to access local knowledge of Aboriginal/or Torres Strait Islander cultures.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and their language groups were, and are still, many and varied; there is no homogeneous Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander culture. It has been estimated that, before colonisation, there were about 600 Aboriginal language groups, while now the number is thought to be about 200. Every community, while sharing some common beliefs and practices, is unique. It may help to think about the use of the word ‘nation’ in this context. People may see Germany and The Netherlands or Australia and New Zealand as similar nations. While this may be true, there are also important cultural differences. This is similar for Aboriginal nations – there may be significant cultural differences between them. For example, talking about ‘Aboriginal health’ would be like talking about ‘European health.

3) Identify any significant historical issues in relation to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and the land that the service is on, including at regional and state levels.

Australia has two Indigenous cultures as part of its national heritage – Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the First Australians, having lived in Australia for more than 40,000 years. There is no place in Australia that is not Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander land. Culture is of central importance to how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples understand their
identities and live their lives. Through culture, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples experience strong connections to family, country, spirituality and community. However, these cultures are complex and extremely diverse. There is no single Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture or group, but numerous groupings, languages and kinship, and diverse ways of living. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples may live in urban, rural or remote settings, in urbanised, traditional or other lifestyles, and may move between these ways of living. As in all cultures, individuals are influenced by their own experiences and their own stories.

4) Reflect on and document the contemporary impacts of historical issues including those relating to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, such as the impact of colonisation, historical events and issues on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were forced off their traditional lands, away from their active hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups resisted the seizure of their lands, resulting in violence.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people died from infectious diseases brought into the country by Europeans.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were moved to missions or reserves,
where they were forbidden to speak their own language or maintain their cultural practices.
• Laws were enacted, limiting the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,
segregating them from other Australians and giving them little or no self-determination.
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were forcibly removed from their families and communities, to be raised in institutions or by foster families of European background.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffered physical or sexual abuse in
institutions, or lived in servitude or poverty as labourers and domestic workers.
• Many lost their language and cultural identity as they were expected to adopt European dress, language, religion, lifestyle and cultural values.
• Many were prevented from having any contact with their Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander family, even by letter - some later tried to reunite with their families, with mixed
results.


Can some one help me please, i am stacked in these question. please some one help me thanks i am looking forward to hear form you soon

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Mon Sep 07, 2015 11:16 pm

5) Well the crazy part is that racism and stereotyping are not just something that one person does to others - for example, sometimes without realizing it, we absorb racist beliefs unconsciously and they affect how we feel about ourselves. Or sometimes racism is built into the way our society works.

Here are some things you can do to address racism and stereotypes:
Well the crazy part is that racism and stereotyping are not just something that one person does to others - for example, sometimes without realizing it, we absorb racist beliefs unconsciously and they affect how we feel about ourselves. Or sometimes racism is built into the way our society works.
Here are some things you can do to address racism and stereotypes:
1. If you feel safe in a situation, speak up when you hear a racist comment or joke. People often ignore jokes because they don't know what to say. But staying silent can make some people think that you agree with the comment.

2. Be a role model. People around you respond to how you deal with racism. Treating others fairly sends the message that no one should be treated differently.

3. Work to recognize stereotypes in television, movies, and other media. And refuse to watch television programs or movies that contain racism.

4. Start an equality club at your school to encourage other youth to talk about racism and what you can do to make your school and community a safer place for everyone.

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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Wed Sep 09, 2015 2:32 pm

a) Research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities
Student instructions
• Using the Web or local library research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in the area where you work, or are undertaking your work placement.

This practice resource — working with Aboriginal people and communities is a guide for all
Community Services and relevant non-government organisation (NGO) staff, particularly field staff. It has been developed to improve service delivery to Aboriginal people by providing staff with key facts, and information relevant to working with Aboriginal communities in NSW. This resource will help us become more culturally aware and responsive to the needs of Aboriginal people and communities. Working with Aboriginal people and communities provides important information to improve our knowledge and understanding of the diverse cultural dynamics that exist within Aboriginal families and communities. It suggests some engagement and communication strategies that will improve the way we work with and relate to Aboriginal people. Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is something all allied health students will probably experience regardless of their clinical education placement context.

• As part of your research, consult with appropriate persons to access local knowledge of Aboriginal/or Torres Strait Islander cultures.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and their language groups were, and are still, many and varied; there is no homogeneous Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander culture. It has been estimated that, before colonisation, there were about 600 Aboriginal language groups, while now the number is thought to be about 200. Every community, while sharing some common beliefs and practices, is unique. It may help to think about the use of the word ‘nation’ in this context. People may see Germany and The Netherlands or Australia and New Zealand as similar nations. While this may be true, there are also important cultural differences. This is similar for Aboriginal nations – there may be significant cultural differences between them. For example, talking about ‘Aboriginal health’ would be like talking about ‘European health.

Identify any significant historical issues in relation to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and the land that the service is on, including at regional and state levels.
Australia has two Indigenous cultures as part of its national heritage – Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the First Australians, having lived in Australia for more than 40,000 years. There is no place in Australia that is not Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander land. Culture is of central importance to how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples understand their
identities and live their lives. Through culture, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples experience strong connections to family, country, spirituality and community. However, these cultures are complex and extremely diverse. There is no single Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture or group, but numerous groupings, languages and kinships, and diverse ways of living. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples may live in urban, rural or remote settings, in urbanised, traditional or other lifestyles, and may move between these ways of living. As in all cultures, individuals are influenced by their own experiences and their own stories.
• Reflect on and document the contemporary impacts of historical issues including those relating to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, such as the impact of colonisation, historical events and issues on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were forced off their traditional lands, away from their active hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups resisted the seizure of their lands, resulting in violence.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people died from infectious diseases brought into the country by Europeans.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were moved to missions or reserves,
where they were forbidden to speak their own language or maintain their cultural practices.
• Laws were enacted, limiting the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,
segregating them from other Australians and giving them little or no self-determination.
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were forcibly removed from their families and communities, to be raised in institutions or by foster families of European background.
• Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffered physical or sexual abuse in
institutions, or lived in servitude or poverty as labourers and domestic workers.
• Many lost their language and cultural identity as they were expected to adopt European dress, language, religion, lifestyle and cultural values.
• Many were prevented from having any contact with their Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander family, even by letter - some later tried to reunite with their families, with mixed
results.
• Write a short report (approximately 500 words) summarising your findings, and explaining how this information can be taken into account when implementing the curriculum, including activities, experiences, customs and events within the service and promoting inclusive behaviours.

b) Cultural competence induction kit
Student instructions
• Prepare an induction kit for new educators and staff in an education and care setting to help them understand cultural competence as described in the EYLF.

This resource kit was produced in response to a need identified by the diversity program coordinators within the Alberta Health Services that health care rofessionals need easy access to information in order to enhance their skills in providing culturally competent care to individuals and families from diverse cultural backgrounds. The resource kit provides an overview of the following topic areas:
Changing demographics in Calgary, focusing on the increase in visible minority
and immigrant populations within the city and its consequence on health practices.
The need for cultural competency in health care. Culture as a determinant of health,
illustrating how economic, political and social backgrounds affect health conditions
of newcomers. Addressing communication barriers that exist within the health care system. World views on health issues, including ethno-specific information as well
as general suggestions for enhancing culturally competent practice. Culturally sensitive assessment and information gathering, including assessment tools and models specialized for diverse populations. Culturally sensitive care and service
provision for ethnic groups. Community resources aimed at ethno cultural issues, including current contact information and brief descriptions of each organization.
Alberta Health Services Diversity Programs, and Other resources for learning.
In addition to descriptive information, practical tools and suggestions are included in
this resource manual. The contents of this Cultural Competency Resource Kit are to be used as a guideline to educate health care professionals with general information regarding cross-cultural practices concerning the health and well-being of diverse populations. This kit is NOT designed to promote stereotyping of all dividual
and families from these diverse ethnic backgrounds. It is to be used as a tool to
enhance cultural sensitivity, awareness, and practice within health care service delivery. It is also important to keep in mind that cultural competency is a continuous learning process. Health care providers are encouraged to utilize a variety of means to enhance their practices surrounding competent delivery of service. This resource kit is only one way to enhance one’s knowledge and skills. Purpose

• Your kit should be based around applicable guidelines applicable to the early childhood sector, supporting documents available to help educators successfully implement the EYLF and other relevant resources from early childhood agencies and/or reliable websites that will equip new employees with the knowledge required to enact culturally competency.

• Collect relevant policies and procedures from your workplace or host organisation where you are undertaking work placement that employees should adhere to when on the job. For example, policies to include may be in relation to:
- equal opportunity
Equal opportunity is a requirement under both Victorian and Commonwealth legislation. In Victoria, the main piece of legislation which makes it unlawful to discriminate is the Equal Opportunity Act 2010 (Vic) (EO Act 2010)
Equal opportunity means that every person can participate freely and equally in areas of public life such as in the workplace, in education, or in accessing goods and services. Discrimination is treating, or proposing to treat, someone unfavourably or bullying them because of a personal characteristic protected by law. Equal opportunity law aims to promote everyone's right to equal opportunities; eliminate, as far as possible, discrimination and sexual harassment; and provide redress for people whose rights have been breached.
All employees, students, parents, school council members, contractors and volunteers are required to act in accordance with equal opportunity, anti-discrimination, harassment and vilification legislation. We all have a responsibility to ensure department workplaces including schools are respectful, safe and inclusive and free of discrimination, harassment, vilification and otherwise unlawful and unacceptable behaviours.


- diversity and inclusion


- enrolment and orientation
• At enrolment and orientation you will:

• meet your teachers
• talk about your subjects and course structure
• enrol in subjects
• find out important information about your course
• find your way around campus
• make new friends.
- partnership and communicating with families to name a few.


• Outline in your kit:
- relevant legislation and Government requirements that relate to cultural competence, specifically for educators in early childhood settings



- how to deal with racism and stereotypes

Here are some things you can do to address racism and stereotypes:
Well the crazy part is that racism and stereotyping are not just something that one person does to others - for example, sometimes without realizing it, we absorb racist beliefs unconsciously and they affect how we feel about ourselves. Or sometimes racism is built into the way our society works.
Here are some things you can do to address racism and stereotypes:
1. If you feel safe in a situation, speak up when you hear a racist comment or joke. People often ignore jokes because they don't know what to say. But staying silent can make some people think that you agree with the comment.

2. Be a role model. People around you respond to how you deal with racism. Treating others fairly sends the message that no one should be treated differently.

3. Work to recognize stereotypes in television, movies, and other media. And refuse to watch television programs or movies that contain racism.

4. Start an equality club at your school to encourage other youth to talk about racism and what you can do to make your school and community a safer place for everyone.




Well the crazy part is that racism and stereotyping are not just something that one person does to others - for example, sometimes without realizing it, we absorb racist beliefs unconsciously and they affect how we feel about ourselves. Or sometimes racism is built into the way our society works.





- a culturally safe environment and what it means

Culturally safe service delivery is critical in enhancing personal empowerment and, as a result, should promote more effective and meaningful pathways to self-determination for Indigenous people. Little has been said about encouraging people from Indigenous groups into the health and education discipline(s) to help provide a safe environment which includes cultural safety. This is a phrase originally coined by Maori nurses which means that there is no assault on a person's identity. The people most able or equipped to provide a culturally safe atmosphere are people from the same culture. We need to move on from the 'short term, cost effective, quick fix' approach to Indigenous issues, driven by economic imperatives, the clamouring of industry and conservative, hegemonic practices. To genuinely address the challenges of Indigenous health and education, the issue of cultural safety cannot be avoided. Critical reflection on experiential knowledge and defining or framing a debate on cultural safety is essential. This paper briefly examines some considerations for work practice.
OR
Cultural safety means an environment which is spiritually, socially and emotionally
safe, as well as physically safe for people; where there is no assault, challenge or
denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience, of learning together with dignity and truly listening. Unsafe cultural practice is any action that diminishes, demeans or disempowers the cultural identity and wellbeing of an individual or group. Past unsafe cultural practices are a major factor in Indigenous people’s abhorrence and distrust of research.
OR
Cultural safety is about creating an environment where the Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person is not only treated well and in a culturally respectful manner, but they are also:
• empowered to actively participate in interactions, believing they are valued, understood and taken seriously • Supported to carry out culturally significant tasks
as part of service delivery. An illustration of this is when an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander worker is supported to meet cultural obligations within their job role and such
obligations are recognised as valid aspects of the work. For example; a worker may spend time cooking for a funeral and, instead of not allowing this to happen or assuming this is ‘time off’, the non-Aboriginal worker listens to explanations and respects the need for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worker to undertake this task as part of their job.

- the resources (at least 8) available to support educators incorporate cultural competence into practice and policy, for example interpreters, advisory bodies or others that can support individual children with specific cultural needs.

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Lorina
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Fri Sep 11, 2015 6:13 am

First off, you don't need to keep posting your questions over and over again. It makes it very confusing. I understand that you may require my help and I will offer my help when I can. So, please just post your questions and responses once. Secondly I have noticed for this assignment you have copied and pasted huge chunks of information which doesn't make sense to what the question is asking. If you are using information from another source just make sure that it is relevant and then re-write it in your own words. You will also need to add references to this information of where you got the info from.

To your questions:

Using the Web or local library research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in the area where you work, or are undertaking your work placement.

This is referring to Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander communities in your work area.

Identify any significant historical issues in relation to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and the land that the service is on, including at regional and state levels.

Once againt this is asking particlualry about where the centre is located.

Write a short report (approximately 500 words) summarising your findings, and explaining how this information can be taken into account when implementing the curriculum, including activities, experiences, customs and events within the service and promoting inclusive behaviours.

Have you done this? Couldn't see it in your response.

Regarding the Cultural Competence Kit, the first half of the information on "Alberta Health Services" is irrelevant. You can use some information from the following topic with the same question:

Cultural Competence Induction Kit

This will help for your final question:

Cultural Safety

Hope this helps,

:geek:,
Lorina

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mwibusa
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Fri Sep 11, 2015 12:22 pm

Hello Lorina, Would you please help me because i am so confused on how to put these sentence in my own word. can you please help me on how to do the first question and show me on how to start writing a report of 500 words please. Also i am not working how i can complite these assessment and i don't know any this about work? Please Please help me Thanks

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Lorina
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Fri Sep 11, 2015 1:28 pm

You can find this information on the Internet... You just need to spend time researching... Let's see...What area are you in? I'll try and help you find information on the Aboriginal Coomunity in your area...

:geek:,
Lorina

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mwibusa
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Fri Sep 11, 2015 1:35 pm

yes Please help me for that, i am living in Toowoomba QLD 4350 thanks

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Lorina
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by Lorina » Sat Sep 12, 2015 6:16 am

Here is some information:

Toowoomba and Darling Downs

:geek:,
Lorina

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mwibusa
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Wed Oct 14, 2015 2:41 pm

He, Lorina.
thanks for the information that you provided for me, but i have open the Toowoomba and Daring downs i couldn't find aney information that relented on this question. please i need your more help and i hope you will help me thanks

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mwibusa
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Re: CHCECE001 - Develop Cultural Competence

Post by mwibusa » Fri Nov 27, 2015 1:11 pm

Hello Lorian, Could you please help me to finish this assessment because i have i have finished it but the person who was marking has sended it back to me and i don't know how to correct the mistake. i believe in you and i know that i will get help form you as soon as possible.
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