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MTOP Learning Outcome 5: Children Are Effective Communicators

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The following lists the sub outcomes, examples of evidence when children can achieve each sub outcome and how educators can promote and help children to achieve MTOP Learning Outcome 5 - Children Are Effective Communicators.

In school-age care settings, children build individual capabilities as well as community connections. Children use their communication skills particularly as listeners and speakers to engage in relationships with others. Play in all its dimensions provides children with opportunities for communication.

MTOP Learning Outcome 5: Children Are Effective Communicators

5.1 Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • engage in enjoyable interactions using verbal and non-verbal language
  • convey and construct messages with purpose and confidence, building on home/family and community literacies
  • use language and representations from play, music and art to share and project meaning
  • contribute their ideas and experiences in play, small and large group discussions, including decision-making opportunities such as making group rules
  • are independent communicators who initiate Standard Australian English and home language conversations and
  • demonstrate the ability to meet the listeners’ needs
  • interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, clarify and challenge thinking, debate, negotiate and share new understandings
  • convey and construct messages with purpose and confidence, for example expressing needs, conflict resolution, following directions
  • express ideas and feelings and understand and respect the perspectives of others
  • use verbal and non-verbal language to communicate thinking
  • participate in play opportunities that promote social interaction with peers

Educators promote this learning by:

  • respond sensitively and appropriately to children’s conversations
  • value children’s linguistic heritage and with family and community members encourage the use of and acquisition of
  • home languages and Standard Australian English
  • collaborate about routines and procedures
  • model language and encourage children to express themselves through language in a range of contexts and for a range of purposes including leading and following directions
  • engage in sustained communication with children about ideas and experiences
  • include real-life experiences and resources to promote children’s use of literacy and numeracy
  • allow children to direct their own play experiences with their peers

5.2 Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • enjoy stories, verse and lyrics
  • view, listen to and enjoy printed, visual and multimedia texts
  • take on roles of literacy and numeracy users in their play
  • actively use, engage with and share the enjoyment of language and texts in a range of ways
  • recognise and engage with written and oral culturally constructed texts
  • use a range of texts for instructions for leisure activities such as sport and craft

Educators promote this learning by:

  • provide opportunities for children to follow directions from everyday texts such as recipe books, instructions for craft, rules for sports or games.
  • read and share a range of books, magazines and newspapers with children
  • provide a literacy-enriched environment including display print in home languages and Standard Australian English
  • incorporate familiar family and community texts and tell stories
  • encourage children to share their interests in music and discuss lyrics
  • engage children in discussions about books and other texts that promote consideration of diverse perspectives

5.3 Children collaborate with others, express ideas and make meaning using a range of media and communication technologies

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • engage with media and technology for fun and to make meaning
  • use language and engage in play to imagine and create roles, scripts and ideas
  • use the creative arts such as drawing, painting, sculpture, drama, dance, movement, music and storytelling
  • use technologies in everyday life, for example, recording daily activities in program journals
  • use information and communication technologies to express ideas, access images, information and explore diverse perspectives
  • engage with information and communication technology tools for designing, drawing, editing, reflecting and composing

Educators promote this learning by:

  • build on children’s family and community experiences with creative and expressive arts
  • provide a range of resources that enable children to express meaning using photography, visual arts, dance, drama and music
  • join in children’s play and leisure activities and co-construct materials, for example, signs, posters and journals that
  • extend and support literacy learning
  • collaborate with children to record the shared activities undertaken
  • integrate technologies into children’s play and leisure experiences, projects and routines
  • encourage the use of technologies between children, and children and educators
  • discuss protocols about the use of communication technologies

References:
MTOP Learning Outcomes, Aussie Childcare Network
How Children Can Achieve MTOP Learning Outcomes, Aussie Childcare Network
How Educators Can Promote MTOP Learning Outcomes, Aussie Childcare Network

Last modified on Sunday, October 18, 2020
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