developing cultural competence in the workplace: • the National Quality Framework

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whollymolly
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developing cultural competence in the workplace: • the National Quality Framework

Postby whollymolly » Tue May 09, 2017 11:14 pm

hi ,
i need help- to see if my answer is correct... thank
Complete the table below demonstrating how you would access the following in relation to developing cultural competence in the workplace:
• the National Quality Framework
• the National Quality Standards
• the relevant approved learning framework

Under the NQS there are a number of sections relevant to embedding cultural competence into the workplace. What are the main Standards and Elements that support this?
Guidance: Search for the word “Cultural” in the Guide to NQS. Reflect On Own Cultural Identity & Biases - I have element 1.2.2: Every Child Is Supported To Participate In The Program

Research Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders - I have element 6.4.1: The Service Participates In The Community & Demonstrates Respect For Families & Communities

Support Individual Cultural Identities - I have quality area 5: Relationships With Children

Create Environments To Support Children's Cross-Cultural Understanding & Relationships - I have element 1.1.1: The EYLF Guides Curriculum Decision Making & Enables Each Child's Learning In The 5 Outcomes

Support The Implementation Of Inclusive Learning Experiences - I have element 3.2.1: Outdoor and Indoor Spaces Are Designed & Organized To Engage Every Child In Quality Experiences     
EYLF
What are the principles that underlay cultural competence as described in the EYLF? ‘Cultural competence is underpinned by the Principles outlined in the EYLF: secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships, partnerships, high expectations and equity respect for diversity. Becoming ‘culturally competent’ requires educators to engage with the fifth Principle —ongoing learning and reflective practice. The Educators’ Guide to the EYLF (p. 24) highlights our role in ‘closing the gap in current educational outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’. As educators, we contribute to improved learning outcomes for Indigenous children directly when our educational programs reflect children’s cultural ways of being and knowing and when we make particular efforts to build strong relationships with their families, so that children grow strong in culture and engage with learning.
FASC
In the FASC the Practice of Cultural Competence describes how
“Educators who are culturally competent respect multiple cultural ways of knowing, seeing and living, celebrate the benefits of diversity and have an ability to understand and honour differences.”

Which everyday practice is recommended for educators to demonstrate an ongoing commitment to developing their own
cultural competence? Cultural competence are the principles of trust, respect for diversity, equity, fairness, and social justice… Culture is the fundamental building block of identity and the development of a strong cultural identity is essential to children’s healthy sense of who they are and where they belong. There are links to cultural competence in Learning Outcome 2 – Children are connected with and contribute to their world, including:
children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation
children respond to diversity with respect
children become aware of fairness
children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment. Cultural competence also includes our efforts to value and build connections with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Programs that highlight and share Australia’s rich Indigenous culture with all children contribute to the work of Reconciliation and support the rights of all citizens to be valued.
Educators who are culturally competent respect multiple cultural ways of knowing, seeing and living, celebrate the benefits of diversity and have an ability to understand and honour differences.’ (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations [DEEWR], 2009, p. 16
The Guide to the National Law and National Regulations describes how a centre should consider the family and cultural values, age, and physical and intellectual development and abilities of each child.

Which of the National Regulations does it state are relevant to this? EDUCATION AND CARE SERVICES NATIONAL REGULATIONS - REG 155
Interactions with children
155 Interactions with children
An approved provider must take reasonable steps to ensure that the education and care service provides education and care to children in a way that-
(a) encourages the children to express themselves and their opinions; and
(b) allows the children to undertake experiences that develop self-reliance and self-esteem; and
(c) maintains at all times the dignity and rights of each child; and
(d) gives each child positive guidance and encouragement toward acceptable behaviour; and
(e) has regard to the family and cultural values, age, and physical and intellectual development and abilities of each child being educated and cared for by the service.

The Guide to the National Law and National Regulations has a reference to Child Enrolment Records.

Which of the regulations are relevant and how is this relevant to culture? National Regulations: Regulations 102, 160-162
The Approved Provider and family day care educator must keep an enrolment record for each child enrolled at an Approved Service. The enrolment record must contain the following information:
• full name, date of birth and address of the child
• name, address and contact details for:
• each known parent
• any emergency contact
• any authorised nominee
• any person who is authorised to consent to medical treatment or administration of medication
• any person who is authorised to give permission to an educator to remove the child from the education and care service premises
• details of any court orders, parenting orders or parenting plans
• gender of the child
• language used in the child’s home
• cultural background of the child and parents
• any special considerations for the child, such as any cultural, religious or dietary requirements of additional needs
• authorisations for:
o the Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor or an educator (including family day care educator) to seek medical treatment for the child and/or ambulance transportation
o the service to take the child on regular outings
• name, address and telephone number of the child’s registered medical practitioner or medical service
• child’s Medicare number (if available)
• details of any specific healthcare needs of the child, including any medical condition, allergies or a diagnosis that the child is at risk of anaphylaxis
• any medical management plan, anaphylaxis management plan or risk minimisation plan for the child
• any dietary requirements of the child
• immunisation status of the child
• if the Approved Provider or staff member has sighted a health record for that child, a notation of that fact.


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