Intentional Teaching Examples In QKLG

Intentional Teaching Examples In QKLG

Intentional Teaching examples are provided for each key focus and significant aspect of learning.

When educators explicitly teach knowledge and skills to individuals or small groups that supports the children learning it is intentional teaching. 

Identity

1.1 Building a sense of security and trust.

For example, teachers:

  • organise and take the time to engage in personal conversations with children and their families to make them feel welcome and valued
  • invite children and families to share images, objects and resources that reflect their cultural and social backgrounds
  • seek out partners who can assist them to understand and use culturally appropriate interactional patterns with children and families
  • collaborate with families and children to develop farewell routines and set up activities that help children settle on arrival
  • introduce and explain why new people are in the environment and what children might do or expect from these people
  • explicitly teach children how to seek help from peers and adults, e.g. specific words, voice tones and behaviours
  • talk with children about plans for play and new learning opportunities to help them lookforward to learning
  • talk with children about options they can choose when they need personal space or one-on-one time and about ways to seek and accept comfort
  • work alongside children modelling ways to seek help, interact with new people, engage in new play or group learning situations, etc.
  • frequently talk through the daily routine, refer to visual prompts, e.g. photos, and discuss or predict what will happen next
  • openly discuss and negotiate changes, e.g. to stay outside for longer, and deal with related questions/concerns, such as, “But when will we eat our morning tea?”
1.2 Acting with increasing independence and perseverance.

For example, teachers:

  • provide prompts and feedback to support children’s attempts to play and make choices independently
  • explicitly teach and reinforce routines and expectations for managing personal belongings and daily routines, e.g. using picture cues
  • explain and guide children to learn ways to care for the classroom environment and keep classroom resources organised and tidy
  • pose open-ended questions to help children identify ways to manage or solve everyday organisational problems, e.g. “What do you need to help you finish this?”, “Who could help you?”, “Where could you look?”
  • provide encouragement and celebrate children’s attempts to try and retry new or challenging tasks and experiences, that is, to persevere, e.g. “You are really thinking hard”, “You have almost got it. Just one more!”, “That’s it, you did it! How do you feel about that?”
  • apply a familiar skill or strategy to manage a new situation more independently, e.g. “Galloping is like walking but you keep the same foot forward”, “Turn the bolt like you turn on a tap.”
1.3 Building a confident self-identity.

For example, teachers:

  • work with parents and families to create a personal poster, book or display to share with peers, featuring photos or objects related to children’s families, community experiences and/ or what they like to do, e.g. a display related to a child’s experiences at a cultural celebration or wedding, a book about favourite weekend activities, a display related to cultural food preparation such as a Chinese wok and steamer, a Samoan hangi or an African tagine
  • invite Elders, parents, family and community members to share experiences, stories, rituals, music and songs
  • invite another child into a conversation when a child is sharing a personal experience using their first language, AAC, SAE approximations and/or SAE
  • talk one-on-one with children and/or use photos or drawings to help children choose some familiar and some new play and other learning experiences
  • display photos and record captions (in SAE and first language) to support all partners to share children’s excitement about new learning
  • work with partners to include relevant music, art, images, photographs and/or objects in everyday learning that reflect children’s cultural heritages, e.g. viewing a Maori poi dance, experimenting with Chinese brush painting, exploring rhythms they can make using Indigenous musical instruments
  • ask questions to discover links between children’s emerging interests and ideas and their wider cultural, family and community experiences
  • provide positive verbal prompts to help children take safe risks, experiment and “have a go”, e.g. try a puzzle, physical challenge or pretend writing
  • talk out loud, modelling new activities and strategies and both how and when to get help, e.g. “We could ask a friend to hold the tube as we wrap the tape around.”
  • ask questions to help children share something they can do or have learnt
  • talk with children about personal attributes, while looking into a mirror
  • play alongside children in new play situations and provide positive feedback on their attempts to interact with new resources, different peers and adults

Connectedness

2.1 Building positive relationships with others.

For example, teachers:

  • model ways to share ideas and listen to others to initiate and continue play, and provide verbal prompts to help children apply strategies, e.g. “Explain to Callum why you are taking the dolls to the block area.”
  • model strategies to resolve conflict and support children to use the strategies in everyday situations, e.g. words or phrases to use, when to seek help from an adult
  • teach children explicitly how to participate in different group learning experiences by stating and modelling expectations clearly and providing positive feedback when children attempt to engage appropriately in group learning experiences such as story reading, musical games and planning discussions
  • introduce and join in turn-taking games to support children learning what it means to have “a turn” and let someone else have a turn when playing music or a card game
  • discuss in everyday situations where and why people have rights or responsibilities, and what that might mean or look like, e.g. “How can we make it fair if both of you want a turn on a swing?”
  • model ways to adjust behaviours and interactions to suit social situations or particular people, e.g. use first language when speaking to a community member
  • model ways to challenge behaviours that may exclude some people, e.g. “If you play the game on top of the fort, how will Sarika join in? She still has her leg in plaster.”
2.2 Showing increasing respect for diversity.

For example, teachers:

  • invite and support parents, family and community members to share and talk about the importance of artefacts, tools, places, stories, languages, dances and accounts from their own culture/s, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ cultures and other cultures and heritages
  • share photographs, images, maps, artworks, letters, postcards, etc. from people in other times and places; ask specific questions to promote children’s curiosity and model positive ways to talk about similarities and differences they identify, e.g. ways people live now or have lived in the past, ways they share understandings about their world
  • share contemporary images and texts about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples that highlight the ways they are connected to places, histories, heritages and languages
  • organise opportunities for children to participate in community arts experiences, learn from Elders and artists in the community, visit art galleries or interactive museum displays, or visit museum sites via the internet
  • ask questions to support children to talk positively about similarities and differences between their own and others’ families, e.g. share family photos and texts about families from different communities and cultural groups and discuss why it might be nice to live in a large extended family, in a family with just one parent, in a family on a remote property in Western Queensland or in a small village in Samoa
  • model and reinforce children’s efforts to listen and accept points of view, ideas or opinions that may be different from their own, e.g. “Cassie, you listened to Marian and helped her find a way to change the building,” or “Do you agree, only the kindy group can be firefighters? What if the pre-kindy kids want to be firefighters too?”
  • model ways to challenge representations of people that are based on stereotypical views, e.g. contest the statement that “only girls dance”, ask questions about representations of people in texts that reinforce stereotypes, such as showing grandparents as inactive or girls as scared
2.3 Showing increasing respect for environments.

For example, teachers:

  • organise and label materials and resources, and explain expectations clearly so that children can easily care for materials, spaces, tools and technologies used when playing
  • model and explain ways to care for class pets, animals found in the playground and plants
  • set up spaces in the room where children can: – observe animals, plants and natural objects in detail, e.g. observing plants, flowers, insects, shells and seed pods using magnifying glasses – represent thoughts and observations about them, e.g. observational drawings using a variety of art materials, such as oil pastels or watercolour paints
  • observe, photograph and draw changes children see in the environment, e.g. as a shop is built nearby, as seeds grow
  • model exploring the qualities of natural and human-made materials, e.g. mixing sand, gravel and water, changing water into ice, changing the texture of soap or clay using water, using sandpaper to shape and smooth wood
  • share and discuss “news” related to the environment or get involved in projects that help care for local environments, e.g. discussions about an oil spill and its impact on birds and
  • fish, clean up the playground for Clean-up Australia Day, ask a child about a family project to make a compost heap to recycle and re-use food scraps
  • encourage children to share images or personal experiences of beautiful and special natural environments
  • model and explain ways children can help to care for environments and save resources, e.g. turn taps off so water isn’t wasted, put food in reusable containers instead of plastic bags
  • encourage curiosity and help children to ask questions about their world, e.g. “Why do leaves become crunchy?”
  • discuss rules that help protect environments and people in particular environments, e.g. stay on the path when bushwalking so you don’t damage plants, swim between the flags at the beach, don’t go swimming if there is a “crocodile” sign, throw rubbish — even small pieces — in bins

Wellbeing

3.1 Building a sense of autonomy and wellbeing.

For example, teachers:

  • build up a bank of photographs of resources and spaces to help children make indoor and outdoor play choices and use materials flexibly, e.g. chairs, tables, large boxes, tubes, ladders, pieces of hosing, telephones, blocks, construction kits, fabric, dress-up clothes, art and collage materials
  • set up art materials to encourage children to choose ways to use, re-use and combine materials, change and vary art materials, and ensure the materials have different sensory and aesthetic qualities, e.g. materials with a variety of textures, and tools that allow children to explore visual effects
  • provide positive feedback and ideas to help manage change or an unexpected situation, e.g. “You watched Lucy try the new game, so you could see how to play it”, “When there is a new teacher in the room, you are the expert. You can be a big help to them by showing them where things are”, or “You got a big surprise when the bird flew in. It was a good idea to stay with a friend and keep still.”
  • introduce new materials or challenges and make it clear that it is all right to just “have a go”: practise, experiment, try out ideas and ask for help
  • play different types of music and provide props and materials, e.g. ribbons, fabric pieces, paint and paper, to prompt children to express who they are and how they feel “in the moment” through movement or visual arts experiences
  • label and discuss feelings, and provide ideas for managing strong feelings, e.g. “You can say, ‘Stop it. I don’t like sand in my eyes’ ”, or “You are feeling very sad. Let’s ask a special friend to join in with us and play a game you like.”
  • explicitly introduce relaxation techniques, including deep breathing, tensing and relaxing parts of their body, visualising, feeling the calmness in their body and mind, and thinking quietly about something that makes them smile
3.2 Exploring ways to show care and concern and interact positively with others.

For example, teachers:

  • draw children’s attention to opportunities to interact with others, e.g. “Sasha, you had fun playing with Harry and the felt board yesterday”, “Dakshesh, Lucas is looking for someone to play the matching game you like.”
  • model and provide verbal prompts to support children to help others, e.g. “Jamie, please show Ragini where the paints are on the shelves”, “I’ll hold the gate open for you, Samir, and you can hold it for Ryan”, “Thea knows some English words but you can also show her how to play the game.”
  • model and provide positive feedback when a child attempts to help or show concern for others, e.g. stops and places a hand on another child’s shoulder when they have tripped, passes a friend a missing shoe, gets a cloth to help someone wipe up a spill, gets an adult if someone is hurt
  • model and prompt children to use language to – start a game, e.g. “Let’s pretend I’m the Dad. Who will you be?” – enter play with others, e.g. “I can help. Here’s some big blocks” – keep the play going, e.g. “Your turn, now?”, “How about if we share?”
  • encourage children to chat about themselves and share personal experiences, e.g. share and talk about photos and objects of interest, talk about similarities and differences between their experiences such as places they go, people in their family, foods they like to eat
  • point out similarities and differences in people’s feelings and ideas and identify positive ways to respond to others, e.g. “Giving Leon a big hug makes him feel worried. He might like it better if you stand near him, or just take his hand”, “Janeeta has a different idea. We’ll listen to her and then we’ll talk about all the ideas.”
  • sit with children, e.g. at meal times or when playing with dough or sand, and encourage playful chat, e.g. making up jokes, commenting on what animals the clouds look like, sitting inside a tunnel and giggling, sharing a funny book
  • talk about and describe what it looks like (actions, facial expressions), feels like (happy, fun), sounds like (words to use, voice tone) to be a friend in emerging situations, e.g. “What would it ‘look like’ to be a friend who shares the dough”, ‘I’ll help you say some words that make you ‘sound like’ a friend.”
  • model positive responses to others’ ideas and achievements, e.g. give a thumbs-up or high five, and say, “Yeah! Let’s do it!”, accept suggestions with a smile and nod
3.3 Exploring ways to promote own and others health and safety.

For example, teachers:

  • work with parents and other partners to reinforce: – family health and safety routines, e.g. teeth cleaning, nose blowing – health and safety practices and community services or programs, e.g. stranger danger, road safety
  • explain the purpose of safety rules, reinforce them and negotiate rules with children when new or potential safety issues arise
  • explain the purpose of health-related routines, e.g. washing hands, toileting, using tongs to handle food, putting on sunscreen, teeth cleaning or rinsing, and provide visual, verbal and nonverbal prompts and reminders to help children follow routines, e.g. charts, signs, photos and augmentative communication symbols
  • use spontaneous and planned learning opportunities to make explicit which foods are healthy, why they are important and why it is important to eat a balance of types of foods, e.g. when cooking and at meal times, read books together about healthy foods, talk about the vitamins and “energy” that come from particular foods, look at healthy and less healthy foods in junk mail catalogues
  • use spontaneous and planned learning opportunities to make explicit a variety of activities that help to keep you healthy, e.g. playing energetic games in the backyard or in the park, going swimming, doing some gardening, getting enough sleep at night
  • introduce simple physical games children can play with friends and family members at kindergarten and at home, e.g. bat and ball games, chasing games
  • talk about and reinforce behaviours related to helping others meet or manage their health or safety needs, e.g. knowing not to bring or share particular foods, as some people have allergies, putting away construction sets with small pieces when a baby or toddler is nearby, reminding a friend to wash their hands
  • talk with partners to understand home routines and practices
3.4 Exploring ways to promote physical wellbeing.

For example, teachers:

vary the set-up of obstacle courses to purposefully develop specific movement skills or createm challenges, and verbally prompt children to move in specific ways, e.g. jumping forward, sideways and off low objects; sliding on their stomachs or crawling along boards; stepping over beanbags or in/on objects; balancing along ropes, on cup stilts, boards, beams or stepping stones; climbing up or crawling across a ladder; rolling on mats

teach a variety of games and ways to play with balls and beanbags of various sizes, e.g. throw, roll, kick or strike balls at or into targets (basket, wall target, hoop); toss and catch beanbags and balls; suspend a ball in a stocking and strike it with hands or short- or long-handled bats; manoeuvre a ball around obstacles with their foot or a hockey stick

plan specific activities to build arm, hand and trunk strength and stability, e.g. pull on body weight or hang by arms from ropes, poles, swings or along boards or mats; squeeze and grip bats, sponges full of water, dough or clay; use a child-sized and weighted hammer; lift buckets and spades with sand or water; push a wheelbarrow, trolley or box

introduce movement songs and games to broaden and practise specific movements, e.g. crawl, creep, gallop, tiptoe, sway, turn, spin, curl, roll

purposefully vary materials and model new ways to use a range of fine-motor skills in such contexts as: – playing games, e.g. use a computer mouse to draw or move objects through a maze; press, pull, place and rotate magnetic, mosaic or peg board pieces; use a keyboard to type pretend “invitations” – creating artworks, e.g. snip, cut, shape, twist, rip, roll and join different materials; manipulate clay, dough and plasticine; use tools that require different hand movements and grips – cooking, e.g. beat, stir, squeeze, pinch, sprinkle, roll and cut; use graters, garlic crusher and eggflip to make dough pizzas for pretend play – playing musical instruments, e.g. shaking a tambourine, beating a triangle, drumming with hands or drumstick, striking a xylophone

organise time, space and support so children can sustain active involvement in a variety of movement experiences, e.g. free dance, running games, or swinging by their arms for increasing lengths of time

Active Learning

4.1 Building positive dispositions and approaches towards learning.

For example, teachers:

  • invite children to discuss and share learning and discoveries in group discussions and identify “experts” who peers can seek out for help, e.g. a child who knows how to fold a paper plane or do the new puzzle
  • help children to consider options for play before starting play, e.g. recall plans for play made the previous day or in informal conversations as children arrived, and introduce teacher-initiated experiences or materials
  • actively seek to learn words in children’s first language or signed communication, to use to encourage and support individual children, e.g. how to communicate, “I will help you.”
  • provide specific feedback to children about the strategies that are helping them to work out a problem or manage a challenging task, and direct their attention to other aspects of the task or problem they may need to consider, e.g. “You’ve moved the character to the middle of the maze, but the treasure wasn’t there. Can you go back through the maze or use a help screen?”
  • identify, with partners, strategies to use to encourage children to try new experiences, try to solve problems for themselves and work together, e.g. provide clear verbal prompts on options to try, rather than taking over
  • provoke exploration, discovery and inquiry by providing new and intriguing materials and resources, such as arts materials and tools and scientific resources, e.g. various bubble-making materials/mixtures, microscope, magnets, materials that float or sink
4.2 Increasing confidence and involvement in learning.

For example, teachers:

  • invite children to discuss and share learning and discoveries in group discussions and identify “experts” who peers can seek out for help, e.g. a child who knows how to fold a paper plane or do the new puzzle
  • help children to consider options for play before starting play, e.g. recall plans for play made the previous day or in informal conversations as children arrived, and introduce teacher-initiated experiences or materials
  • actively seek to learn words in children’s first language or signed communication, to use to encourage and support individual children, e.g. how to communicate, “I will help you.”
  • provide specific feedback to children about the strategies that are helping them to work out a problem or manage a challenging task, and direct their attention to other aspects of the task or problem they may need to consider, e.g. “You’ve moved the character to the middle of the maze, but the treasure wasn’t there. Can you go back through the maze or use a help screen?”
  • identify, with partners, strategies to use to encourage children to try new experiences, try to solve problems for themselves and work together, e.g. provide clear verbal prompts on options to try, rather than taking over
  • provoke exploration, discovery and inquiry by providing new and intriguing materials and resources, such as arts materials and tools and scientific resources, e.g. various bubble-making materials/mixtures, microscope, magnets, materials that float or sink
4.3 Engaging in ways to be imaginative and creative.

For example, teachers:

  • pose questions that encourage wonder and imagination, e.g. “I wonder what might happen if …?”, “Imagine if …?”, “How amazing would it be if …”
  • support children to select, display and respond to interesting images and objects, both collected and made, and artworks, by drawing attention to their sensory and aesthetic qualities
  • prompt children to try many ways to use materials, media and tools, e.g. “What’s another way to use the sponge with the paint?”, “How could you use the fabric pieces in your dance/pretend play ‘show’?”
  • prompt children to consider possibilities for using objects, sounds, movements and language to symbolise ideas, e.g. fabric to represent a lake, or experiment with their voice to create sounds
  • prompt children to move in different ways as you play different or changing rhythms on a tambourine, e.g. move different body parts, change speed, direction or level of movement
  • use specific language to draw children’s attention to aspects of colour, texture, shape or pattern as they paint, print, construct or sculpt
  • ask challenging questions to prompt children to explore ways to use their voice, language, gestures, costumes and/or props related to roles they take in pretend games, e.g. “What words, type of voice or tools might the ambulance officer use?”
  • support children to play with and share ideas about media in play contexts, e.g. ways to create and use digital images, ways to create a pretend play game based on a familiar children’s TV program
  • plan opportunities to explore different types of musical experiences indoors and outdoors, e.g. sing, chant, use instruments, compose music, respond to diverse types of music, exploring rhythm, beat, volume and pitch
4.4 Exploring tools technologies and information and communication technologies (ICTs).

For example, teachers:

  • ask specific questions to prompt children to use understandings about everyday tools and technologies in play, e.g. “How will you catch the fish?”, “What tools could help us move the heavy bucket?”
  • introduce specific tools and technologies that can help children to solve a problem or investigate an idea, e.g. a pulley for lifting toys, a torch to send “SOS” signals across a distance, a scanner to save and share a photo
  • engage with children and learn together about ways to use emerging or new technologies, e.g. a new online tool, secure social networking site, compact personal technologies
  • help children to use technologies for real personal and social purposes, e.g. access their family’s holiday blog to share their experiences with friends, communicate with a parent via email or chat room about their kindy day
  • introduce technologies to encourage children to imagine and be creative, e.g. software, musical instruments, different art and construction tools
  • periodically change options and choices, so children use ICTs for a range of purposes, such as to: – entertain, e.g. provide links to music clips and online stories – create, e.g. use drawing software to create a menu and a map – play games, e.g. a number game, problem-solving game or thinking game
  • prompt or suggest ways children can be “experts” and help peers to use ICTs and other technologies, or complete challenging levels of games together
  • pose questions and support children to collaborate to research a topic online, e.g. access maps, artworks, information websites, such as a museum website
  • support children to create images using a digital camera and arrange or combine their images creatively to represent experiences

Reference:

State Government Of Queensland (2010), Queensland Kindergarten Learning Guidelines

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Last modified on Friday, April 14, 2017
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